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ISHS Acta Horticulturae 455: V International Mango Symposium

MANGO DECLINE: RESEARCH IN FLORIDA ON AN APPARENTLY WIDE-SPREAD DISEASE COMPLEX

Authors:   R.C. Ploetz, D. Benscher, A. Vázquez, A. Colls, J. Nagel, B. Schaffer
Keywords:   Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Dothiorella dominicana, host predisposition, Mangifera indica, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Phomopsis spp., tip dieback
DOI:   10.17660/ActaHortic.1997.455.72
Abstract:
Decline disorders are recognized in virtually all mango-producing regions of the world. Although fungi are the implicated incitants in many locations, abiotic stresses, such as host nutritional deficiencies, are thought to play roles in other situations. Recently, we sought to clarify the etiology of mango decline in Florida. During field surveys, the most common internal colonists of symptomatic tissues were, alphabetically: Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium sp., Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Dothiorella dominicana, Fusarium spp., Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Penicillium sp., Pestalotiopsis sp. and Phomopsis spp. The relative abundance of the isolated species varied by sample source and date of recovery. On grafted plants of cv. Keitt, A. alternata, C. gloeosporioides, D. dominicana, L. theobromae and two species of Phomopsis caused all or some of the following decline symptoms: bud necrosis, tip dieback, gummosis and vascular discoloration. In general, symptoms caused by the different fungi could not be distinguished. The data indicate that mango decline is a disease complex in Florida caused by several different fungi. These results corroborate work by others which indicted one to several different fungi as causes of these disorders worldwide. Research is warranted to clarify how abiotic factors interact with these fungi to damage mango.

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