ISHS


Acta
Horticulturae
Home


Login
Logout
Status


Help

ISHS Home

ISHS Contact

Consultation
statistics
index


Search
 
ISHS Acta Horticulturae 989: Southeast Asia Symposium on Quality Management in Postharvest Systems and Asia Pacific Symposium on Postharvest Quality Management of Root and Tuber Crops

EXPRESSION OF PHYSICAL WOUND STRESS-RESPONSIVE GENES IN ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA AND CABBAGE (BRASSICA OLERACEA VAR. CAPITATA L.)

Authors:   M. Thammawong, T. Kaneta, H. Umehara, N. Nakamura, Y. Ito, T. Shiina
Keywords:   Arabidopsis, Brassica oleracea var. capitata L., cabbage, stress-responsive gene, wounding treatment
DOI:   10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.989.6
Abstract:
Mechanical disruption of the cell wall results in stress signaling, cellular response, and metabolism changes in plant cells. However, the molecular mechanisms in relation to mechanical/physical stress of fresh produce are still unclear. In this study, we have utilized mechanical wounding as the stress stimulus to study the expression of candidate stress-responsive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf (AtERF#018, CML38, ACS6, PAL1) and in cabbage (Brassica oleracea ‘Early Ball’) head leaf (BoCam1, BoCam2). In Arabidopsis leaf, the expression of AtERF#018 was rapidly induced within 5 min. after the wounding treatment. The increase in the CML38 and ACS6 expression levels were observed at 15 min. Although a significant increase of the expression was observed at 60 min. after the wounding treatment, the expression of PAL1 remained low during the investigation period. For cabbage, the predominant increases in BoCam1 expression levels in head leaf disks were observed at 30 and 60 min. after treatment. In contrast, the expression level of BoCam2 was detected at low level and the significant increase in expression of BoCam2 was found at 120 to 240 min. after the wounding treatment. Expression levels of candidate stress-responsive genes were correlated with the time after stress induction for both Arabidopsis and cabbage. Overall, applying a mechanical wounding stimulus clearly affected the expression of stress-responsive genes. The rapid response of these genes may consequently affect the cellular response and metabolism changes in Arabidopsis and in cabbage.

Download Adobe Acrobat Reader (free software to read PDF files)

989_5     989     989_7

URL www.actahort.org      Hosted by KU Leuven      © ISHS