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ISHS Acta Horticulturae 987: International Symposium on High Tunnel Horticultural Crop Production

YIELD AND POSTHARVEST ATTRIBUTES OF CANEBERRIES GROWN UNDER HIGH TUNNELS AND IN THE OPEN FIELD IN NORTH CAROLINA

Authors:   G.E. Fernandez, P. Perkins-Veazie
Keywords:   Rubus spp., season extension, protected culture
DOI:   10.17660/ActaHortic.2013.987.12
Abstract:
Season of ripening, yield (total, marketable, fruit size), and postharvest attributes, were collected from replicated trials of caneberries in North Carolina. Primocane-fruiting (PFR) and floricane-fruiting raspberries (FFR) and blackberries (FFB) were grown under high tunnels and in an open adjacent field “outside” the tunnel. Total and marketable yield of PFR was higher for all five cultivars tested when grown under the tunnels. When averaged over three years, marketable yield was 32 and 276% higher for ‘Nantahala’ and ‘Autumn Britten’ respectively when grown under the tunnels compared to plots outside of the tunnels. Individual fruit size of PFR was not consistently greater under the tunnel. Tunnels in general enabled PFR fruit to be harvested 19-25 days earlier in the season, but did not consistently extend the harvest later into the summer. Tunnels with PRF berries had less mold and less leakage than fruit harvested outside of the tunnel. ‘Caroline’ had Overall highest postharvest ratings and ‘Himbo Top’ had overall lowest ratings both under the tunnel and outside of the tunnels. Total and marketable yield of the six FFR was generally higher when grown under tunnels. Marketable yield of tunnel grown cultivars was 39 to 119% higher for ‘Moutere’ and ‘Lauren’, respectively. Fruit size was not consistently greater under tunnels and no early or late harvest season extension was seen with FFR cultivars. Postharvest quality of FFR did not consistently improve under tunnels. Marketable yield of FFB increased 12% ‘Navaho’ and 65% for ‘Arapaho’ but decreased 18% for ‘Von’ when grown under high tunnels. Fruit size and harvest season of FFB did not change under the tunnels conditions. Further, postharvest quality of tunnel grown FFB was not significantly improved under tunnels. Our results indicate that in North Carolina, of all the types of caneberries evaluated, primocane fruiting raspberries benefit most from tunnel production.

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