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ISHS Acta Horticulturae 898: V International Symposium on Seed, Transplant and Stand Establishment of Horticultural Crops

VEGETABLE GERMPLASM CONSERVATION AND UTILIZATION AT AVRDC - THE WORLD VEGETABLE CENTER

Author:   A.W. Ebert
Keywords:   genebank, germplasm enhancement, documentation, seed distribution, safety duplication, vegetable breeding
Abstract:
Diverse and readily accessible genetic resources are vital to crop improvement programs oriented toward high and stable yields, resistance against biotic and abiotic stress, and specific consumer preferences. To contribute to food and nutritional security for an increasing global population, AVRDC Ė The World Vegetable Center conserves more than 56,000 germplasm accessions in its genebank, and is the worldís most important public-domain source for vegetable crops. The AVRDC Vegetable Genetic Resources Information System provides direct web-based access to information pertaining to the accessions in the genebank. The Centerís Genetic Resources and Seed Unit and Global Technology Dissemination Group distributed 8789 accessions of vegetable germplasm and improved breeding lines in 2008. Seed was distributed to 67 countries worldwide, with a total of 5897 accessions/breeding lines sent out. Germplasm is shared with national agricultural research and extension systems, universities, and the private sector for crop improvement programs and related research. In-house use of germplasm and breeding lines was also substantial in 2008, amounting to 1085 genebank accessions screened and evaluated by the Centerís headquarters, and 1807 accessions and/or breeding lines used by the Centerís regional offices. A total of 7350 genebank accessions were sent to the Svalbard Global Seed Vault and more than 5000 accessions to the genebank of the National Agrobiodiversity Center in the Republic of Korea for long-term safety duplication. The Centerís plant pathologists and breeders use genebank material extensively to identify new sources of specific genes responsible for resistance against biotic and abiotic stress, desired horticultural traits, or health-promoting factors in wild and cultivated germplasm. These vegetable improvement efforts have led to the development and release of numerous vegetable lines resistant to specific pests and diseases, heat-tolerant, and rich in health-promoting compounds.
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