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ISHS Acta Horticulturae 841: II International Symposium on Human Health Effects of Fruits and Vegetables: FAVHEALTH 2007

RADISH LEAVES AND RADISH ROOTS: ARE WE EATING THE RIGHT PART FOR CANCER PREVENTION?

Authors:   T.J. O'Hare, L.S. Wong, L.E. Force
Keywords:   glucoraphenin, glucodehydroerucin, glucoraphasatin, sulphoraphene
DOI:   10.17660/ActaHortic.2009.841.86
Abstract:
Radishes are most commonly consumed as a root vegetable, although radish leaves are occasionally used in salads and cooking. While both the radish root and shoot contain glucosinolates with anti-cancer potential, the glucosinolate profile of the root and the shoot are very different. Whereas the root contains mainly glucodehydroerucin (2.8 μmol/gFW) (also known as glucoraphasatin), the main glucosinolate components of the shoot are glucoraphanin (2.8 μmol/gFW) and glucoraphenin (2.1 μmol/gFW). Upon hydrolysis, the latter glucosinolates produce sulforaphane and sulforaphene respectively, both potent inducers of mammalian phase 2 enzymes. Previously, radishes have been dismissed as having minimal anti-cancer potential based on studies with radish roots. However, depending on the cultivar, radish shoots can have up to 45 times the capacity of roots to induce phase 2 enzymes. In fact, shoots of a number of radish cultivars (eg. ‘Black Spanish’) have similar or greater anti-cancer potential than broccoli florets, a vegetable that has received considerable interest in this area.
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