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ISHS Acta Horticulturae 684: Meeting of the Physiology Section of the European Association for Potato Research

INFLUENCE OF A CONTROLLED RELEASE NITROGEN FERTILIZER PROGRAM ON POTATO (SOLANUM TUBEROSUM L.) TUBER YIELD AND QUALITY

Author:   C.M. Hutchinson
Keywords:   controlled release fertilizer, CRF, potato chip
Abstract:
Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a high valued vegetable crop in Florida. The combination of sub-surface irrigation methods, weather conditions during the potato season, and fertilization practices can cause nitrates to leach into the watershed. This led to the development of best management practices (BMP) that limit nitrogen fertilizer use in potato production. BMP nitrogen rates (224 kg ha-1) reduce the potential movement of nitrate from potato fields into surrounding watersheds but can also impact tuber quality and yield. ĎAtlanticí processing potato production and quality were evaluated in a low-rate controlled release fertilizer (CRF), polymer coated urea, system in a replicated field trial in Hastings, FL, USA in 2003. Three CRF products (A, B, and C) engineered to release completely by 120, 75, and 45 days after application, respectively, were compared to no nitrogen and ammonium nitrate (AN: 168 and 224 kg N ha-1) treatments. Different CRF blends were all applied at 168 kg N ha-1. Fertilizer treatments were applied at planting. Plants in the A:B:C (33:33:33) treatment produced significantly more total tuber yield than plants in the no nitrogen, AN 168 kg N ha-1, B (100) and A:C (67:33) treatments. Tubers from plants in the A:B:C (33:33:33) treatment exhibited 69% less internal heat necrosis compared to tubers from plants in the AN (224 kg N ha-1) treatment.
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