ISHS


Acta
Horticulturae
Home


Login
Logout
Status


Help

ISHS Home

ISHS Contact

Consultation
statistics
index


Search
 
ISHS Acta Horticulturae 1245: International Forum on Horticultural Product Quality

Carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment in greenhouse enhanced growth and productivity of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during winter

Authors:   S. Boondum, P. Chulaka, P. Kaewsorn, T. Nukaya, M. Takagaki, W. Yamori
Keywords:   controlled environment, photosynthesis, yield, ascorbic acid, fruit quality
DOI:   10.17660/ActaHortic.2019.1245.9
Abstract:
Tomato production in greenhouses is extremely popular in both Thailand and Japan. Greenhouse production in winter is often faced with insufficient CO2 for photosynthesis and this decreases plant growth, yield and quality. This research studied CO2 enrichment on growth, yield and quality of tomatoes in winter at The Center for Environment, Health and Field Science, Chiba University, Japan during October 2014 to March 2015. The air temperature was maintained at 23.9/12.3°C day/night. The experiment was a completely randomized design with 2 treatments and 15 replications. Tomatoes were grown in D-shape cell trays (250 mL pot‑1) filled with 250 mL rockwool substrate per cell. CO2 was added to 600-800 ppm, and compared with natural CO2 (400 ppm) in greenhouse. Plant biomass (46.9 g), total fruit weight (2,221.7 g plant‑1), fruit weight (143.6 g fruit‑1), photosynthetic rate (34.4 µmol m‑2 s‑1), total soluble solids (4.9 °Brix), ascorbic acid content (10.6 mg 100 g‑1 FW) of tomato grown in 600-800 ppm CO2 were significantly higher than those grown in natural CO2 (41.57 g, 1,861.9 g plant‑1, 124.7 g fruit‑1, 21.41 µmol m‑2 s‑1, 4.4 °Brix and 9.7 mg 100 g‑1 FW). Moreover, the productivity increased 19.32%. Thus, it is concluded that the 600-800 ppm CO2 promoted the growth and quality of tomatoes grown in greenhouses during winter.

Download Adobe Acrobat Reader (free software to read PDF files)

1245_8     1245     1245_10

URL www.actahort.org      Hosted by KU Leuven      © ISHS